Falls, Tech

Spotlight on Falls

 

Falls are one of the most feared health emergencies for older people and their families. In our three-part series, we will be shining a spotlight on falls, the changes we aspire to make and the impact these will have in reducing falls. We begin by looking at how falls impact older people and the implications for a person when they fall.

The potential to have a fall is something many older people and their families dread. Whether the person lives at home, is in hospital or in a care home, having a fall can have significant and far-reaching consequences. It’s something many health and social care staff also fear and often find difficult to mitigate against and manage. 

 

What do we know about falls?

The 2018 ‘NICE impact report on falls and fragility fractures’ said:

Older people are more likely to fall. They are also more likely to suffer significant consequences, such as a loss of independence and confidence, leading to physical and mental deterioration and frailty. This increases the risk of a person experiencing multimorbidity, which is when a person has 2 or more long-term health conditions. It can also increase their risk of further falls and fractures.

In 2015/16, NHS Improvement reported that 204,269 inpatient falls were voluntarily reported by acute trusts, with a fall rate of 2.8 falls per 100 patients. However, many falls occur at home and go unreported, so the true incidence of all falls is unknown. It is estimated that approximately 30% of people older than 65 fall at least once a year; this is around 3 million people in England.

The 2022 Age and Ageing Journal published the first ‘World guidelines for falls prevention and management for older adults’ that said: 

Falls occur at all ages and are an inevitable part of a bipedal gait and physical activity. They occur in 30% of adults aged over 65 years annually, for whom the consequences are more serious, despite concerted efforts of researchers and clinicians to understand, assess and manage their risks and causes. In addition to personal distress, falls and fall-related injuries are a serious health care problem because of their association with subsequent morbidity, disability, hospitalisation, institutionalisation and mortality.

In Europe, total deaths and disability-adjusted life years due to falls have increased steadily since 1990. The Global Burden of Disease study reported nearly 17 million years of life lost from falls in 2017. Related societal and economic consequences are substantial. In high-income countries, approximately 1% of health care costs are fall-related expenditures.

Note: NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) are currently updating their guidance on Falls and their new recommendations will be published in August 2024.

 

Falls and care homes

With these statistics in mind our Associate Director, Preet Shergill, has made falls the subject of his NHS Digital Academy TOPOL Fellowship (TOPOL Fellowships were borne out of the 2019 Review conducted by Eric Topol MD entitled ‘Preparing the healthcare workforce to deliver the digital future’). In his first blog for the NHS Digital Academy about his fellowship entitled ‘Empowering social care through digital innovation: My Topol Digital Fellowship journey’ Preet said:

The public health data highlights the urgent need for falls prevention strategies, given the impending exponential growth in the 85+ age group. In my local county of Buckinghamshire, the number of people over 85 is projected to rise by 78% over the next 12 years. The total annual cost of fragility fractures to the UK, including social care, is estimated at £4.4 billion.

 

What are the current challenges around falls?

As we go into the autumn and winter seasons, falls join flu, Covid and many other seasonal challenges making NHS-related headlines every year. Falls outside are more likely in cold and icy conditions, and falls inside become more common when people are unwell with infections and more confused, tired or struggling with their balance.

Once a person has a fall, shock and distress are highly likely, making the psychological impact immediate. The physical consequences can, at worst, mean broken bones – hip fractures are especially common and often life-changing or life-shortening – and, if the person has hit their head, potentially the consequences can be fatal. 

Even if these worst-case scenarios are avoided, a fall often means going to hospital for a precautionary scan and tests, an in-patient stay may be needed, pain may be difficult to assess and control, and bruising and any cuts can take a long time to heal. 

With extended waiting times for ambulances, overstretched A and E departments, shortages of beds on wards, and the difficulties for an older person or a person with dementia when they are in an unfamiliar environment (that can often lead to further falls, loss of independence, weight loss and incontinence), going to hospital alone can be a traumatic experience.

Even if a person’s physical injuries heal, the physiological ones often remain. The person may repeatedly think about how they fell and what the cause was. They may become fearful of walking, or lose confidence in maintaining aspects of their independence that they feel may have either led to their fall or could lead to another fall. It then becomes a vicious circle of reduced mobility, with the physical consequences of pressure ulcer risks and greater chances of infections like UTI’s, and greater dependence, which can often erode feelings of self-worth and self-esteem.

 

Falls matter to everyone

Because falls have such a massive impact on the lives of people who fall and their families, we believe they are a vital issue for us to understand more about. We need to find innovative ways to prevent falls and, should a fall still occur, manage a person’s recovery as effectively as possible through modern rehabilitation techniques – like our personalised, at-home physio service – to ensure the best quality of life for our residents.

We will never be able to prevent every fall, or indeed the physical and psychological effects a person may be living with from a fall prior to moving into a Peverel Court Care Home. What we can do, however, is change the narrative and our approaches to find new solutions and ways of thinking.

 

What’s next?

In our second blog of this series, we will hear from some of our residents, families, staff and other healthcare professionals about their personal and professional experiences of falls. We will also discuss how digital transformation can lead to a positive impact in reducing falls.

 

About Peverel Court Care

Peverel Court Care is a group of one residential and two nursing homes, located in Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire. Bartlett’s Residential Care Home and Stone House Nursing Home in Aylesbury, and Merryfield House Nursing Home in Witney. We are a long-standing family business. Providing exceptional, personalised care, delivered by talented and compassionate people, in exclusive and idyllic settings.

With happiness at the heart of our homes, we recognise and respect the contribution made by our residents to society during their lifetimes. Valued by residents and their families; our reputation, investment in each property, and approach to appointing and developing our staff makes each home unique and the benchmark in premium care.

Bartletts, Events

Bartlett’s Residential Home – Annual Dog Show with Paws PT

Why?

Here at Peverel Court Care, we regularly arrange exciting activities for our residents to help improve their social, emotional, and physical health. This gives them the opportunity to meet and interact with new faces. Having the chance to socialise can help to improve social skills and behaviours, and reduce the feelings of loneliness.

Making invaluable connections and partnerships with organisations, such as Paws PT, helps to enrich the lives of those residing with us, many of those living with dementia. Interaction with animals has well-documented benefits to older people mentally, emotionally, and physically, by improving emotional, social, and cognitive abilities.

Having a meaningful life with strong relationships and purposeful activity is a central part of an individual’s identity. As people become more vulnerable and increasingly reliant on others it is vital that meaningful activity is supported in a way that helps them stay well and feel more satisfied with life, taking account of their personality and their history. Such activities are particularly important in a care home setting where residents have moved out of their familiar home environment, and can quickly lose their sense of identity and self-esteem, and become depressed.

Who?

Based on the grounds of Bartlett’s Residential Home, Paws PT provide a friendly and reliable dog training service to meet the needs of both the client and their dogs.

https://www.facebook.com/pawspt.co.uk/

Outcome

It was a wonderful day, there were so many lovely dogs entered in each category and we were delighted to have Jen and Helen from Paws PT join us to act as judge.

Residents and staff alike were fascinated by the dogs, who were using the gardens as their playground. Many were eager to ask the owners about the age and names of the dogs, and what their favourite treats and toys are! It was a great opportunity to learn more about the different breeds and their personalities. Residents could not believe how well the dogs performed during each category such as “Best Trick” and Dog Walk” and enjoyed their role in choosing the “Best in Show!” One pup helped themself to a prize toy, which our residents found very amusing!

We were blown away by the popularity of this event and we were delighted to welcome so many of our residents’ loved ones and their four-legged friends.

We know how beneficial animal therapy can be for older people, especially for those living with dementia, as being close to animals can help lift a person’s mood and stimulate social interaction. Many residents used to have dogs, so they were thrilled to have the opportunity to be part of our judging panel and to meet so many adorable dogs.

Testimonials

Resident – Barbara W:

What did you think of the event? – “I really enjoyed it thank you, it was great to have my daughter and her dog visit. They won multiple prizes!” [laughing]

Would you like to experience it again? – “Yes of course, it was a lovely event that brough everyone together. And we were lucky with the great weather, too!”

Resident – Anne T:

What did you think of the event? “It was fabulous, I loved meeting all the dogs. They were all very clever – I was impressed!”

Would you like to experience it again? “Yes, most definitely, it is lovely to have animals at the home. I used to have dogs, so it is nice to have them visit.”

Bartletts, Events, Wellbeing

Mortimer Alpacas – Bartlett’s Residential Care Home

The benefits of Animal Therapy in Care Homes

Why?

Improving the quality of life for our residents is our core commitment. As care specialists, Peverel Court Care know how much of a positive effect animal therapy can have on those living with dementia. That’s why we welcomed a visit from Mortimer Alpacas to Bartlett’s Residential Home. 

When visiting our homes, animals help improve the lives of our residents, including those living with dementia, by bettering motor skills, making them feel happier and lifted, encouraging interaction and also triggering reminiscing conversations. Animals can help break the barrier of isolation too often experienced by people with dementia symptoms. Not only do the animals themselves provide the solace and delight of companionship, engaging with pets is the perfect ice-breaker, leading to enhanced social interactions with people. 

Making invaluable connections and partnerships with organisations, such as Mortimer Alpacas, helps to enrich the lives of those residing with us, many of those living with dementia. Interaction with animals has well-documented benefits to older people mentally, emotionally and physically, by improving emotional, social and cognitive abilities. 

Who?

https://mortimer-alpacas.co.uk/ 

A family run business in the beautiful village of Mortimer, Berkshire. It has always been a dream of ours to run an alpaca business and we are fortunate enough to now make it a reality. 

We currently have 10 adorable young boys – George, Zippy, Bungle, Cappuccino, Rupert, Finley, Henry, Hugo, Pip and Truffle. All 10 have totally different personalities and each bring something unique to the experience. 

We have spent time with our alpacas to ensure that they have the right temperament for socialising with humans. Alpacas by nature, although curious, are very shy and not naturally forthcoming. Ours however, we have trained to come for hand feeding and enjoy time together around our guests! 

Outcome

Residents at Bartlett’s received a surprise visit from two friendly alpacas! They were met with gasps and laughter when they took a guided tour around the home. The alpacas were led into the lounge, where they were lavished with affection by residents. It was wonderful to see the look on everyone’s face when they arrived. Most residents needed little encouragement to engage and ask questions during this visit. The alpacas, Finley and Hugo, are comfortable in the lift, so residents on different floors didn’t miss out on their visit. 

Meeting the alpacas was a new experience for all of the residents and, for some, brought back memories of their own pets. Providing activities to evoke memories and reflection helps to give residents a feeling of security and comfort but Bartlett’s is also keen to create new memories and opportunities for residents, enabling them to live stimulating and fulfilling lives. While moving into our homes is a new chapter for them, ensuring that our residents feel like they have a sense of purpose and like they are part of something special is so important. It was a memorable experience had by all! 

Testimonials 

Resident – Janet:

What did you think of the experience? – “I couldn’t believe it when I saw them, they were so funny, they really made me laugh!”

Would you like to experience it again? – “Yes, absolutely, it was nice to have them at the home!” [laughing]

Resident – Rosemarie:

What did you think of the experience? “They were truly amazing, I love animals. I used to have a lot of pets!” 

Would you like to experience it again? “Yes, I would, their fur was so soft! They were very sweet”

Resident – Jill:

What did you think of the experience? “It was interesting, such a lovely surprise! [laughing] they were very soft and calm” 

Would you like to experience it again? “Yes, it was good, it’s lovely when the animals visit.”

Bartletts, Community, Stone House, Wellbeing

Pawside Puppy Visit – Bartlett’s and Stone House

The benefits of Animal Therapy in Care Homes

Why?

As care specialists, Peverel Court Care know how much of a positive effect animal therapy can have on those living with dementia. That’s why we welcomed a visit from Pawside Yoga to Stone House Nursing Home.

Making invaluable connections and partnerships with organisations, such as Pawside Yoga, helps to enrich the lives of those residing with us, many of those living with dementia. Interaction with animals has well-documented benefits to older people mentally, emotionally and physically, by improving emotional, social and cognitive abilities.

When visiting our homes, animals help improve the lives of our residents, including those living with dementia, by bettering motor skills, making them feel happier and lifted, encouraging interaction and also triggering reminiscing conversations.

Who?

https://pawsideyoga.co.uk/

Our Mission – Pawside Yoga

We are a friendly + welcoming group who are passionate about sparking inner peace, conversation & connection through the ancient art of yoga to create a health and fitness class whilst adding our special element combining adorable puppies with creating the most blissful experience you’ve ever been to. We are committed to creating safe spaces that are inclusive & respectful of a diverse community.

Our Values – Pawside Yoga

  • LOVE is our underlying frequency. We have a genuine love for our yogis & we are passionate about uniting humanity through our classes.
  • COMMUNITY Our people (team and students) are at the core of what we do, we strive to learn new perspectives by listening to, learning from & educating our community.
  • LEARNING We use physical practice to spark conversation, curiosity & connection to the body, mind & soul. We aim to cultivate a sacred space for diverse bodies through intentional movement & mindfulness.
  • THE INDIVIDUAL JOURNEY We aim to give you space to explore through the various aspects of yoga & then journey back with a newfound sense of self-connection & appreciation for yourself & others as well as being given the added element of the best cuddles ever with our gorgeous fur babies.
    Outcome

Feedback from residents and carers about Pawside’s visit was overwhelmingly positive, with most residents asking to hold and fuss the puppies. Their eyes lit up and smiles beamed as they saw staff enter the lounge and bedrooms with the litter. Most residents needed little encouragement to engage and ask questions during this visit. They were welcome to cuddle as many puppies as they could, with owner Shani on hand to answer any queries they had. Common questions included how old they were, how many were in the litter, how many boys/girls there were. This provided a heart-warming experience for the residents, with many reminiscing family pets, recalling their names and how long they owned them. This was a happy and expressive session that set an example for future per therapy activities at Stone House.

Testimonials from Bartlett’s

Resident – Denis J:

What did you think of the experience? – “It was great, I got to hold three puppies at once! They were so cute and soft.”

Would you like to experience it again? – “Yes, definitely, I like the animals visiting me in my room!” [laughing]

Resident – Laurie K:

What did you think of the experience? “I loved it, it made my day! The puppies were so small and cute” [laughing]

Would you like to experience it again? “Oh yes, they are welcome any time!”

Resident – Elaine A:

What did you think of the experience? “It was a nice afternoon, they were so lovely and well behaved, they fell asleep in my arms!” 

Would you like to experience it again? “Of course, it was a lovely surprise! I’d like to see them again.”

 

Testimonials from Stone House

Resident – Eunice:

What did you think of the experience? – “They were lovely and ever so cute, I really loved holding them.”

Would you like to experience it again? – “Yes, definitely, I didn’t want to give them back!” [laughing]

Resident – Sheila:

What did you think of the experience? “I loved it, I wanted to keep one!” [laughing]

Would you like to experience it again? “Yes definitely, they were so cute!”

Resident – Heather L:

What did you think of the experience? “It was lovely, I really enjoyed seeing them, my daughter just got a puppy!” 

Would you like to experience it again? “Yes, of course, I really like dogs. I’ve always owned them.”

Stone House, Uncategorized, Wellbeing

The benefits of Flower Arranging in Care Homes

Stone House Nursing Home – January 2023

Who?

Bishopstone Blooms – formally Hearts and Flowers Interiors. Established in the beautiful village of Bishopstone, Deborah and her team have over 29 years of floristry and horticulture experience. (locally community business – care for our community)

www.hearts-interiors.co.uk

Why?

Making invaluable connections and partnerships with organisations, such as Bishopstone Blooms, helps to enrich the lives of those residing with us, many of those living with dementia. Activities such as flower arranging engages the senses, provides cognitive and sensory simulation, improves motor skills, and instils a sense of independence and accomplishment. It is an excellent way to preserve quality of life for a population that may struggle with finding such.

When visiting our homes, Bishopstone Blooms help improve the lives of our residents, including those living with dementia, by bettering motor skills, making them feel happier and lifted, encouraging interaction and also triggering reminiscing conversations.

Outcome

Using a variety of beautiful flowers, residents enjoyed a sunny afternoon creating their own personalised flower displays in the home’s conservatory.

Getting creative with their flowers and foliage, the residents created a number of striking displays, whilst listening to music and chatting with one another over tea and biscuits.

Research has proven that there are many benefits of flower arranging for older people. As well as enabling residents to be creative and use their imagination, it also encourages use of fingers and hands and is a great stress reliever, promoting a calm atmosphere.

Our flower arranging activities provide the perfect opportunity for some of our residents to create floral displays around the home.

Testimonials

Resident – Sheila:
What did you think of the experience? “I enjoyed it, I have put the flowers with the ones my family gave me! I have a lot of them now!” [laughing] Would you like to experience it again? “Yes, thank you, I enjoy flower arranging!”

Resident – Stuart:
What did you think of the experience? “It was good thank you, I just watched, but the nice lady made flowers I could give to my wife when she visits!”
Would you like to experience it again? “Yes, I would, it was nice!”

Resident – Valerie:
What did you think of the experience? “I like flowers, so it was fun to do!”
Would you like to experience it again? “Yes, thank you, I enjoyed it! I got help doing it as well.”

Events, Wellbeing

The benefits of Animal Therapy in Care Homes

 

Amazing Animals Therapy Monkeys – Stone House Nursing Home.

Who?

Here at Amazing Animals, we have been involved in the professional training and supplying of a wide range of animals for the media industry for four decades. Established in 1977, our company has the largest workforce of qualified and experienced animal experts for this type of work in the UK. 

https://www.amazinganimals.co.uk/ 

Why?

As care specialists, Peverel Court Care know how much of a positive effect animal therapy can have on those living with dementia. That’s why we welcomed therapy monkeys from Amazing Animals to Stone House Nursing Home. 

Making invaluable connections and partnerships with organisations, such as Amazing Animals, helps to enrich the lives of those residing with us, many of those living with dementia. Interaction with animals has well-documented benefits to older people mentally, emotionally and physically, by improving emotional, social and cognitive abilities. 

When visiting our homes, animals help improve the lives of our residents, including those living with dementia, by bettering motor skills, making them feel happier and lifted, encouraging interaction and also triggering reminiscing conversations. 

 

 

Testimonials 

Resident – Ronnie Cann:

What did you think of the experience? – “Amazing, the best thing I’ve ever seen!”

Would you like to experience it again? – “Yes, I would!”

Resident – Olive Nicolle:

What did you think of the experience? “I loved it, I saw similar monkeys on the nature programme last night!” [laughing]

Would you like to experience it again? “Yes definitely, it was nice to meet them.”

Resident – Philippa Graham:

What did you think of the experience? “It was funny, they visited me in my room. They were very cute!” [laughing]

Would you like to experience it again? “Yes, I would thank you.”

 

 

Personalisation

Personalisation and its importance in delivering excellence in care

We spend our whole lives developing as individuals. It takes years for us to learn who we truly are, what we like and what we don’t like.
When we’re older and we’re relying on care and support, most of us will express a wish to keep our individuality.

At Peverel Court Care, we know it’s important to deliver services that allow our residents to carry on being the unique, special and one-of-a-kind individuals they’ve been their whole lives.

We do a number of things to make sure that this happens for every person we care for.

Personal care plans
Just meeting the immediate needs of our residents is not enough. Every person we give support to has an individual care plan, which we use to tailor our care to their specific needs.

The plan gives us general information about medication and physical mobility issues, whilst also gathering extra details that allow us to add personalised touches to the care they receive.

We want to know a range of additional information, like what people like to eat and drink, how many hours they like to sleep and if they like to take a nap in the afternoons. We also ask to hear about any social or emotional needs they may have, so that we can give them everything they need to feel safe, secure and comfortable.

Knowing this information about our residents means that we’re able to offer a truly personalised care package.

Personal attentiveness
As part of our care plans, we deliver a personal attentiveness that we’re very proud of. We might learn from a care plan that a resident prefers their hair brushing in a certain way, but that they struggle with mobility. When this is the case, our staff will go out of their way to make sure that residents are happy.

Beverley, who has worked at Peverel Court Care as Senior Care Lead for 9 years, says that this personal attentiveness has a tremendous effect.

“Seeing residents smile when I say hello, or even at the gentle touch of a hand, makes every day worthwhile. They trust, they laugh, they smile, they cry, they are individuals and we are there to protect and care for them. What better job is there?”

She says it is this approach to care that makes residents content and happy.

“A smile costs nothing. Residents have confidence in themselves and sometimes even begin to do things independently.”

Personalised care is the heart of our service
The personalisation of the service we provide is one of our main priorities at Peverel Court Care. No one person is the same. Providing excellent processes and procedures is not enough, the way we look after everyone who lives with us must be tailored to the personal needs of the individual. That way, we can give our residents the sense of importance and belonging they deserve. This high quality, person-centred care is at the heart of what we do.

Stone House

Stone House: from scouting movement to elderly care

Stone houseThe spectacular Stone House in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, is renowned for its aesthetically landscaped gardens and comforting architecture.

Stone House and Baden-Powell

Stone House was constructed in 1862 as a country house. Even during the 19th century, it was a mesmerising construction, with its lush, sprawling lawns and trees dotting the landscape. Located at Bishopstone Road, Stone House was home to Lord Baden-Powell, the pioneer of the scouting movement.

Born in 1857, Robert Baden-Powell became a hero during the Boer War, when he defended Mafeking, a small town near Johannesburg, for 217 days against more than 7,000 Boers. It was during this war that Baden-Powell developed the idea for boy scouts. During the siege, he had organised the boys into a Mafeking Cadet Corps to handle smaller tasks and chores around the town.

He penned several books and papers to talk about his vision of creating the scouting movement. In 1910, he resigned from the Army and formed a committee for the scouting movement. The movement became so popular that it spread to other countries, including Russia, the West Indies, South America and Canada.

The interest in the movement was not limited to boys. Even girls registered for it. Baden-Powell convinced Agnes Baden-Powell, his sister, to organise a separate girls’ movement, which he christened Girl Guides.

Stone House today

Stone House today is a residential nursing home that houses 35 residents. It sits on four acres of beautiful, lush grounds dotted with trees and manicured lawns. It provides around-the-clock nursing care that is tailored to meet the needs of the residents.

While the original architecture has stayed untouched, a few changes have been incorporated in Stone House to comfortably accommodate the needs of the residents. It boasts a relaxing and well-furnished conservatory that offers awe-inspiring views of the grounds. The ensuite bedrooms are tastefully furnished and decorated, and overlook the grounds.

We invite you to visit Stone House and sit with our residents, who love to talk about the history of the house. Once you walk into Stone House, you will realise that we truly believe in exceptional elderly care.

Merryfield

Fiddle cushions create positive experience for Merryfield residents with dementia

Fiddle CushionPeverel Court Care has always given the utmost importance to personalised and exceptional elderly care. Our homes take into consideration the individual needs of residents and personalise the care based on those needs.

Creating a safe haven for residents with dementia

Residents with dementia need specialised care, and we are proud to say that Peverel Court Care staff have the training, knowledge and expertise to offer superior care to such residents.

We realise dementia patients tend to get agitated and anxious at times. It is imperative they calm down for their own safety and others around them. That is why Merryfield Nursing Home has introduced colourful multi-sensory activity cushions known as fiddle cushions.

Fiddle cushions to the rescue

A fiddle cushion offers sensory experience along with activity engagement for fidgety and restless dementia patients. The cushion has a number of objects, such as belt buckles, ribbons, bows, buttoned or Velcroed flaps with pictures, beads on a cord, functional zippers and clothes pegs. These objects are securely fastened with the help of machine stitching or strong crochet cotton. The cushions come in a range of colours, designs and themes.

Trials in care homes have shown that fiddle cushions have the uncanny ability to calm agitated and anxious dementia patients and keep them engaged. One trial also used the cushions to prevent residents from wandering off.

Customised fiddle cushions in Merryfield Nursing Home

Many residents in Merryfield Nursing Home have personalised fiddle cushions that keep them calm and relaxed. One resident loves watches and owls, so her cushion has a few watches along with an owl. Other residents have materials in different textures, zippers and buttons.

As residents manipulate the objects on the cushions, it helps them calm down and diverts their attention by keeping them busy.

Exceptional elderly care is the hallmark of Peverel Court Care, and with the introduction of fiddle cushions in our homes, we have taken our level of care a notch higher.

Stone House

Peverel Court Care offers the most exceptional elderly care in exclusive settings

Bartletts_Back-When elderly parents are unable to take care of themselves and require assistance in day-to-day living activities, it can be very painful and stressful. Thankfully, you never have to worry about your elderly loved one because you can trust and rely on Peverel Court Care to take care of your loved one the way you would.

The glorious history of Peverel Court Care

We have been offering exceptional elderly care since 1986, when Peverel Court Care acquired Stone House Nursing Home. This started our journey into creating a compassionate and caring facility for the elderly. It didn’t take long for Stone House to set the benchmark in elderly care. Our idyllic settings and personalised care played a huge role in bringing Peverel Court Care to the forefront of elderly care assistance and residential facilities.

Following the success of Stone House, Merryfield Nursing Home was added to our portfolio, enabling Peverel Court Care to set the standard in nursing care in Oxfordshire. Today, Bartlett’s Residential Home is also part of our group, which has passed on to the second generation.

The founder’s son has been steering the ship since 2000 and has the same passion and dedication as the founder. Peverel Court Care continues to add more facilities and accommodation whilst making sure superior care standards are always maintained.

What Sets Peverel Court Care Apart?

Peverel Court Care believes in creating a caring, compassionate, dignified, and aesthetically pleasing environment for our residents, who have made immense contributions to our society and local communities. We are different and unique because:

  • We have an excellent reputation with the local and national inspectorate
  • Our home managers, who are registered nurses, have been with us for decades and believe in our ethos and core vision
  • Our homes are well-equipped and our staff are highly trained and qualified to meet the needs of our residents
  • We are committed to staff development and training and a work-life balance that gives a boost to our staff retention endeavours
  • Peverel Court Care offers personalised elderly care in rejuvenating, historic, and spellbinding settings
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